Fending Off Depression with Fish

Fending Off Depression with Fish

Food & Drink

Fending Off Depression with Fish

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By Cari Martens

We’ve all heard that eating oily fish that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids is good for your heart, but a number of recent studies have found that it could also be good for your mental health.

That’s right, it appears fish really is brain food. The old wives’ tale has been supported by science.

Writing for CBN.com, Dr. Barry Sears makes note of the low rates of depression in countries such as Greenland and Japan, where people eat a lot of oily fish, compared to the much higher incidence of depression in the U.S. and Britain, where fish consumption is much lower. Eskimos in Greenland, in fact, have almost no depression, even though they have as little as one or two hours of sunlight on a winter day—which can be pretty depressing.

Prof. Michael Crawford, Director of the Institute of Brain Chemistry and Human Nutrition at North London University, urged more people to eat oily fish, saying he believed that a deficiency in our diets could be a contributory factor in the deterioration of mental health. Research commissioned by the British Trout Association found a clear decrease in fish consumption in Great Britain in recent years, among virtually all age groups.

Prof. Crawford has studied the benefits of Omega-3 for more than 20 years and a major focus of his work has been the role of Omega-3 in brain development and the evolution of mankind. “Medical experts have long known of the benefits of oily fish in the fight against heart disease but it is just as vital as a brain food,” said Prof. Crawford. ‘If we don’t go back to our fish eating days, evolution is in danger of going into reverse.”

Mental illness is increasing dramatically across the world and by 2020 is set to move from No. 4 to No. 2 in the burden of global health problems, with coronary heart disease moving to No. 1.

Most health experts now recommend eating fish such as trout, salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel and shrimp at least twice a week.

Fish…it’ll help keep your heart beating healthy and your attitude upbeat.

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